Applying Ethical Principles In Practice

Introduction


Ethical principles are guidelines that help in protecting study participants and preserving the integrity of research. These principles include social and clinical value, fair subject selection, informed consent, scientific validity, favorable risk-benefit ratio, and informed consent. The paper utilizes a study on a nosocomial infection to address the ethical principles of social and clinical value, fair subject selection, and independent review. Besides, the article will also explain how the role of nurses in research has changed over time.

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Social and Clinical value
Every research aims at answering a specific question. Providing answers to a problem is essential to society because it provides solutions to present or future diseases (Melynk & Overholt, 2015). For instance, the study on the nosocomial infections in ICU in Fiji is sufficient to provide the prevalence data on the problem. The information garnered from the incidence rate is crucial in describing the current epidemiology and improving the methods of control of nosocomial infections in adults (Naidu et al., 2014).

Fair Subject Selection
The primary objective of the study should be to enroll and recruit individuals and groups based on fair selection but not vulnerability or privilege diseases (Melynk & Overholt, 2015). The people should be chosen in a manner that eliminates risks and maximizes benefits to the individuals and society. The recruitment of study participants in our case was fair and included all the ICU patients whose nosocomial infection had been microbiologically confirmed (Naidu et al., 2014).
Independent Review
An independent review committee which has no vested interests in research reviews the proposal, and this helps in minimizing the potential conflicts of interest and ensuring the study is ethically acceptable diseases (Melynk & Overholt, 2015). They consider various components such as bias, protection of the rights of the participants, and the favorability of the risk-benefit ratio. The study under question obtained ethical approval from the Fiji National Ethics Review Committee, and the National Health Research Ethics. It, therefore follows that the researchers were free of bias and employed effective methods of protecting the rights of the participants (Naidu et al., 2014).

How the Role of Nurses in Research has changed over Time
In the mid-19th century, nurses were wearing starched aprons, were trained in hospital etiquette, and they always lived in fear of their matrons or ward sisters. However, the nursing field has undergone substantial transformation today with modern nurses taking part in the processing of complex data and conducting of research. Very few nurses researched in the past, but today many nurses can understand research, appraise the findings of a study, and apply them in daily practice.

Conclusion
Every study should aim at providing an answer to a research problem. The recruitment and enrollment of study participants should be fair and not based on privilege or vulnerability. For a study to obtain ethical approval, it should be free from bias and should endeavor to protect the rights of the participants. Today, many nurses participate in research, appraise study results, and apply them in practice.

References


1. Melynk, B.M., and Overholt, E.F. (2015). Evidence-Based practice in nursing and healthcare: A guide to best practice. Evidence-Based practice in nursing and healthcare: A guide to best practice.

2. Naidu, K., Nabose, I., Ram, S., Viney, K., Graham, S.M., and Bissell, K. (2014). A Descriptive Study of Nosocomial Infections in an Adult Intensive Care Unit in Fiji: 2011-12. Journal of Tropical Medicine, 2014, 1-5. Doi:10.1155/2014/545160

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